Listed below are recent posts across all of CalRecyle's blogs.

  • Eight Ways to Stretch Your Food While Quarantined

    The average family of four spends $150 on uneaten food each year

     

    Most of us are sheltering-in-place right now, having already stocked up on non-perishable canned and frozen food. Since every foray into society could bring exposure to COVID-19, consider ways to maximize the food you have to last as long as possible and save you trips to the grocery store.  It will also help you reduce food waste, a major contributor of greenhouse gases coming out of landfills.

    Here are eight ways to stretch the food you’ve saved:

    1. Make a double batch of sauces, stews, beans, and casseroles, and save the rest in the freezer for a future weeknight dinner with zero cooking.
    2. Create a scrap bag in your freezer to use to make stock for soups and sauces. I have a scrap bag in my freezer full of food scraps. Any time you peel a carrot, slice an onion, or cut the edges off a bell pepper, you can divert the leftovers from the garbage into the scrap bag kept in the freezer. Once the scrap bag is full, simmer the contents with water over low heat for about an hour, then save the liquid for a tasty stock to make soups and sauces. Cook rice, beans, or quinoa in it to add extra flavor. 
    3. Keep bread in the freezer and defrost a slice or two when you need them.
    4. Dried beans are cheap and freeze easily. You can cook a double batch in your crock pot and freeze half for an easy meal.
    5. Soups hold up well when they’re stored in containers in the freezer. You can even freeze individual servings for a quick meal on demand.
    6. Buy meat in bulk, divide it into single portions, and defrost as you need them. Meats can be cheaper in bulk and often have less packaging.
    7. Fruits like berries are simple to freeze. Place them on a cookie sheet, freeze them overnight, and transfer them to an empty container to store in the freezer. Frozen berries liven up morning smoothies.
    8. Butter freezes well and is easy to defrost when you get the baking itch. It’s also often cheaper to buy in bulk.

       

      I hope these tips are as useful to you. To learn more about preventing food waste, please visit Save The Food. Interested in other ways to reduce food waste? Check out the Public Health Alliance of Southern California’s Resource Library and CalRecycle’s Resource Directory.

    Posted on In the Loop by CalRecycle Staff on Mar 23, 2020

  • Fighting Climate Change by Feeding Those in Need

    Team Edible Launches California's First Edible Food Recovery Public Meeting 

     Picture of Kyle Pogue, Martine Boswell, Cara Morgan at a podium presenting.

    CalRecycle "Team Edible" – Kyle Pogue, Martine Boswell, and Cara Morgan

    This past Thursday, February 27, CalRecycle partnered with Yolo Food Bank for California’s very first SB 1383 edible food recovery public kick-off meeting, giving 100 leaders from food recovery organizations, edible food generators, and jurisdictions an in-depth look at how new edible food recovery mandates provide an opportunity to redirect unsold, edible food to Californians who need it most.

    Julie Trueblood

    Julie Trueblood from CalRecycle's Local Assistance and Management (LAMD) team, presented at the event.

    “There is so much food waste that is disposed of on a daily basis in California,” pointed out Martine Boswell, a CalRecycle environmental scientist who advises on food waste prevention, edible food recovery, and overall food waste management. “Edible food that is disposed is unnecessary and, in most cases, completely preventable.”

    Martine explained that while SB 1383, a bill with a goal to reduce short-lived climate pollutants in the atmosphere, has two organic waste disposal reduction targets, it also includes a goal: that 20 percent of edible food currently sent to landfills must be recovered for human consumption by 2025.

    This target provides an opportunity to sustainably fund infrastructure and capacity to help bring millions of pounds of edible food, which retailers have historically sent to landfills, to the one in eight Californians who are food insecure, often not knowing where or when they will get their next meal.

    The term "edible food" means food intended for human consumption. But it must also meet the food safety requirements of the California Retail Food Code. “Food safety is absolutely critical,” Martine assured the gathered stakeholders from Yolo County. 

    Matt Henigan presenting at the Yolo County Food Bank event

    CalRecycle Deputy Director Matt Henigan discussed the issues of climate change and hunger that SB 1383 addresses.

    “SB 1383 is the most wide-ranging and impactful solid waste legislation of the last 30 years,” CalRecycle Deputy Director Matt Henigan told the audience. “It requires a reduction of organic waste by 75 percent by 2025. It also requires a 20 percent edible food recovery goal…This is unique and groundbreaking for California.”

    “We’re very proud at CalRecycle to be a part of feeding hungry people,” Matt Henigan went on, addressing how short-lived climate pollutant bill SB 1383 gives his staff a chance to both help the environment and make a tangible difference to California’s one in five food insecure children.

    Explaining the reason CalRecycle was tasked with reducing organic waste disposal, Matt added that “Two-thirds of the waste stream is organic waste and food waste is the largest component of the waste stream. Landfilling organic waste emits methane, and 21 percent of methane emissions come from landfills. Methane is 70 times more potent than CO2 as a greenhouse gas global warming contributor, which has led to climate change impacts: fires, coastal erosion, and impacts on agriculture. Every 2.5 tons of food that’s diverted is the equivalent of taking one car off the road for a year. Reducing these emissions is by far the best investment we can make.” 

    Yolo County Health & Human Services Branch Manager Nolan Sullivan

    “One in five children in Yolo County is going to go to bed hungry tonight. What are we going to do about it?” Yolo County Health and Human Services Agency Service Centers Branch Manager Nolan Sullivan (pictured above) pointed out the opportunity to solve this significant, problem while working to reach SB 1383’s 20 percent edible food recovery targets.

    CalRecycle Organics Staff

    CalRecycle staff who took part in the event, from left to right:  Matt Henigan (MMLA), Joe Rasmussen (LAMD), Julie Trueblood (LAMD), Ashlee Yee (LAMD), Maria West (Public Affairs), Cara Morgan (LAMD), Tom Steel (Executive Fellow), Pinar Kose (LAMD), Alex Byrne (FiRM), Martine Boswell (STAR), Kyle Pogue (STAR), Sheina Meiners (FiRM), Jeffory McDaniel (LAMD), Ken Yee (LAMD), and John Duke (LAMD). 

    CalRecycle organics staff came together for this exciting event that the department sees as a model for many more food recovery collaboration launches throughout our state in the next year. Forging these connections will help jurisdictions, edible food generators, and food recovery organizations improve existing food recovery networks to ensure that edible food is diverted from landfills and put to its highest and best use of helping feed people in need.  

    Posted on In the Loop by Maria West on Mar 2, 2020

  • Eco Holiday Habits to Get on Santa's Nice List

    During the holidays many of us gather to share special meals, exchange gifts, and enjoy ourselves. As you prepare to host gatherings for your loved ones, consider how your celebrations create waste that contributes to climate change and adds to the growing amount of plastic in landfills. Are you being naughty or nice to the planet?

    Here are three ways to get on the planet’s Nice List this holiday season

    Naughty food waste; nice compost

    Naughty: Throwing Food in the Trash
    Nice: Lowering Food Waste with Meal Plans and Composting

    Meal Plan for Zero Food Waste

    Many of us consider lavish spreads of favorite holiday dishes the hallmark of a caring host. But excess food gives off high amounts of the potent greenhouse gas methane once it’s dumped in a landfill. This is a major cause of climate change.

    Rethink your hosting ideals, brand your gathering eco-friendly, then don’t overbuy or overcook.

    Use the food GUEST-IMATOR tool to plan how much to prepare. If there are leftovers you know you won’t finish, send food home with your guests in reusable containers.

    Clean your plate or compost the rest.

    Try composting your food waste. If your curbside organics collection doesn’t accept food, ask local community gardens if you can contribute to their compost bin.

    Consider setting up your own home compost. It can help grow healthier, heartier plants. Winter is the ideal time to start compost that will be ready to add to your garden in the spring.

    Easy tips for starting to compost

    naughty: single use disposable plastic. Nice: reusable dishes.

    Naughty: Single-Use Plastic
    Nice: Reusable Dishes and Utensils

    “Disposable” Plastic Lasts Forever

    Many hosts choose the ease of disposable plates, cutlery, and cups for holiday gatherings. But that plastic your guests use for just a few minutes will never biodegrade. It stays on the planet, slowly breaking down into toxic microplastics.

    About 10 percent of all trash is plastic. Forty million Californians create more than 3.2 million tons of plastic waste every year.

    Reusable plates and cutlery give the gift of a cleaner planet. Less trash in landfills is worth a few extra minutes of cleanup.

    Naughty: dirty recyclables; nice: clean recyclables

    Naughty: Dirty Recyclables
    Nice: Clean Recyclables 

    Rinse Containers Before Recycling

    Recyclables tainted with food or water can leak onto surrounding paper and cardboard, and create a contaminated, unrecyclable mess. In 2018 China stopped accepting certain US mixed recyclable shipments because many arrived full of mold and had to be thrown away in landfills.

    Clean your containers to keep recycling from becoming garbage. 

    Not sure about that greasy pizza box? Tear off the oily parts and toss those in the trash. The remaining clean cardboard can go in your blue bin.

    Check out this quick video on recycling contamination.

    With a few small changes, you can make a difference for the planet even as you enjoy this festive season. Get more eco-friendly holiday hints to use this year.

     

    Posted on In the Loop by Syd Fong on Dec 23, 2019