Listed below are recent posts across all of CalRecyle's blogs.

  • Survey Says: Californians Support State’s Climate Fight

    Californians overwhelmingly believe global warming is a serious threat and support the state’s efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, according to a report by the Public Policy Institute of California. The report survey shows widespread agreement when it comes to acknowledging the threat of climate change and support for state actions to fight the global temperature rise.

    “There is broad consensus for the state’s efforts to address climate change, and many support the cap-and-trade system,” PPIC President and CEO Mark Baldassare said in a news release.

    According to the report, for which 1,708 California adults were surveyed by phone, 81 percent of Californians believe global warming is a serious threat to the state’s future economy and quality of life. Lower-income residents are more concerned about the climate threat, as are younger Californians.

    • 70 percent of respondents ages 18 to 34 describe climate change as a “very serious threat to the state’s future.”
    • 56 percent of respondents ages 35 to 54 describe climate change as a “very serious threat to the state’s future.”
    • 48 percent of respondents age 55 and older describe climate change as a “very serious threat to the state’s future.”

    The survey shows, 66 percent of California residents believe the effects of global warming have already begun. The same percentage—66 percent—supports the state making its own policies to address global warming. Support for California acting alone to fight climate change is higher among the state’s largest cities.

    • 73 percent of San Francisco Bay area residents support California taking unilateral climate action
    • 70 percent of Los Angeles residents support such unilateral action
    • 63 percent support the policy in the San Diego area
    • 55 percent support California’s “go it alone” climate policies in the Inland Empire
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    The PPIC survey also found broader support among younger Californians for the state to act alone on climate:

    • 75 percent of respondents ages 18 to 34 support unilateral action by California.
    • 65 percent of those ages 35 to 54 support unilateral action by California.
    • 57 percent of respondents age 55 and older support unilateral action by California.

    Seventy-two percent of California adults surveyed favor current legislative targets to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to 40 percent of 1990 levels by the year 2030. About half of likely voters believe California’s climate policies will result in new jobs.

    As an integral part of California’s far-reaching efforts to slow and reverse the effects of climate change, the California Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery is implementing programs and policies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. To date, California Climate Investments has allocated $72 million in Cap-and-Trade proceeds to California’s waste sector, primarily through grants to build or expand conventional compost and in-vessel digestion operations. Grants have included $5 million for food waste recovery projects that divert landfill-destined, edible food to Californians in need.

    CalRecycle is also tasked with overseeing programs to reduce organic waste disposal in California. When sent to landfills, this material decomposes and emits methane—a greenhouse gas 70 times more potent than carbon dioxide. Organic waste accounts for more than one-third of the state’s waste stream.

    In September 2016, Governor Brown signed SB 1383 (Lara, Chapter 395, Statutes of 2016), establishing targets for reduction of short-lived climate pollutants, including methane. The law calls for a 50 percent reduction of organics in landfills by 2020 and 75 percent reduction by 2025. It grants CalRecycle the regulatory authority necessary to reach these targets, which also includes 20 percent of currently disposed edible food be recovered for human consumption by 2025.

    Right now, CalRecycle is engaging waste and recycling businesses, trade associations, and other stakeholders to gather input on the development of regulations to implement SB 1383. Stay up to date on developments and future workshops by joining the SLCP Listserv.

    Posted on In the Loop by Lance Klug on Aug 24, 2017

  • More Jobs, Less Pollution: CalRecycle Awards $24 Million in Grants to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    Cap-and-trade dollars boost local economies with 21st Century infrastructure projects

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    Media Contact: Lance Klug
    (916) 371-6293 |lance.klug@calrecycle.ca.gov                                                                              FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    SACRAMENTO—As an integral part of the state’s far-reaching effort to slow and reverse the effects of climate change, the California Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery has awarded $24 million in grants to help convert more of the state’s organic waste (food, green waste, and wood) into renewable energy and compost.

    “These latest climate investments provide a much-needed boost to California’s organic waste recycling capacity, which the state must roughly double to meet its greenhouse gas reduction and 75 percent recycling goals,” CalRecycle Director Scott Smithline said. “These infrastructure projects will diversify our local economies—creating durable green jobs that can’t be outsourced.”

    When sent to landfills, organic waste decomposes and generates methane, a short-lived climate pollutant 70 times more potent than carbon dioxide. CalRecycle helps fund construction, renovation, or expansion of facilities in California that recycle organic material into value-added products like compost or renewable energy. 

    CalRecycle’s Organics Grant program  is part of California Climate Investments, a statewide program that puts billions of cap-and-trade dollars to work reducing greenhouse gas emissions, strengthening the economy, and improving human health and the environment—particularly in disadvantaged communities.

    Of the $24 million allocated to CalRecycle’s Organics Grant program in 2016-17:

    • $12 million was dedicated to digestion projects, which turn organic waste into renewable energy and soil amendments. Maximum award: $4 million
    • $12 million was dedicated to compost operations—$3 million of which was allocated specifically for projects in rural areas. Maximum award: $3 million

    Demand in CalRecycle’s Organics Grant Program well exceeded the $24 million in available funds for 2016-17, with 35 eligible applicants requesting $88.6 million. CalRecycle granted funds to the 10 highest scoring applicants based on criteria of greenhouse gas reductions, the amount of organic material diverted from landfills, benefits to disadvantaged communities, and project readiness.

    Many infrastructure project proposals included funding for food rescue efforts to recover landfill-destined, edible food for Californians in need. Food waste prevention remains the most environmentally beneficial way to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. While food rescue was not among the scoring criteria for the organics grant, it was a consideration for evaluating benefits to disadvantaged communities.

    FY 2016-17 Organics Grant Program Recipients

    Anaerobic Digestion  Projects:

    County Sanitation Districts  of Los Angeles County

    Los Angeles County

    $4,000,000

    Equipment upgrades to  complete organic food waste pre-processing and anaerobic digestion system.  Grantee will convert regional food waste into renewable gas for  transportation fuel. Includes dedicated funds for partnership with a local  food rescue entity.

    • New Jobs? Yes
    • New Organic Waste Diverted? Yes
    • Food Rescue Component? Yes

    HZIU Kompogas SLO, Inc.

    San Luis Obispo County

    $4,000,000 

    Design, build, and operate  a Kompogas anaerobic digestion facility. Grantee will convert regional  organic waste into renewable electricity and compost. Includes dedicated  funds for partnership with Valley Food Bank.

    • New Jobs? Yes
    • New Organic Waste Diverted? Yes
    • Food Rescue Component? Yes

    Rialto Bioenergy Facility,  LLC

    San Bernardino County

    $4,000,000 

    Equipment upgrades to in-vessel  digestion facility to process regional food waste into renewable electricity.  Includes dedicated funds for partnership with Helping Hands Pantry.

    • New Jobs? Yes
    • New Organic Waste Diverted? Yes
    • Food Rescue Component? Yes

    Compost Projects:

    City of San Diego

    San Diego County

    $3,000,000 

    Equipment upgrade of  current windrow composting facility to a covered aerated static pile system.  Will enable regional expansion of food waste composting program. Includes  dedicated funds for partnership with Kitchens for Good.

    • New Jobs? Yes
    • New Organic Waste Diverted? Yes
    • Food Rescue Component? Yes

    Mid Valley Recycling, LLC

    Fresno County

    Expansion of current  aerated static pile composting system to support new organic waste recycling  programs in the community.

    $1,875,000 

    • New Jobs? Yes
    • New Organic Waste Diverted? Yes
    • Food Rescue Component? No

    Salinas Valley Solid Waste  Authority

    Monterey County

    $1,341,865 

    Expansion of current  organic chip and grind facility to include a food waste composting operation.  Includes equipment upgrades and dedicated funds for partnership with Food  Bank for Monterey County.

    • New Jobs? Yes
    • New Organic Waste Diverted? Yes
    • Food Rescue Component? Yes

    Recology Yuba-Sutter

    Yuba County

    First of three -phase  project to design, build, and operate new covered aerated static pile compost  system to recycle regional green waste.

    $2,783,135 

    • New Jobs? Yes
    • New Organic Waste Diverted? Yes
    • Food Rescue Component? No

    Rural Compost Projects:

    Napa Recycling & Waste  Services, LLC

    Napa County

    Equipment upgrades to  recover more food waste for grantee’s existing compost operation. Includes  dedicated funds for partnership with Emergency Food Bank of Stockton.

    $541,700 

    • New Jobs? Yes
    • New Organic Waste Diverted? Yes
    • Food Rescue Component? Yes

    South Lake Refuse Company,  LLC

    Lake County

    Equipment upgrades to  expand existing green waste composting site to include food waste composting.  Includes dedicated funds for partnership with Sacramento Food Bank and Family  Services.

    $1,218,026

    • New Jobs? Yes
    • New Organic Waste Diverted? Yes
    • Food Rescue Component? Yes

    West Coast Waste

    Madera County

    Design, build, and operate  new aerated static pile composting system to recycle regional organic waste.  An on-site learning center is also planned.

    $1,240,274 

    • New Jobs? Yes
    • New Organic Waste Diverted? Yes
    • Food Rescue Component? No

    Total: $24,000,000

    Eligible applicants for CalRecycle’s Organics Grant program include cities, counties, and other local agencies; businesses; California universities and colleges; nonprofit organizations; and qualifying Indian Tribes.

    Learn more about CalRecycle’s new Food Waste Prevention and Rescue Grant Program, California’s new push to recover edible food for hungry people before it becomes waste, and the state’s latest investments to turn food and other organic waste into renewable energy or increase compost capacity and demand in California.

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    Posted on In the Loop by Lance Klug on Aug 17, 2017

  • Back-to-School Tools from CalRecycle

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    School is out for summer, but not for much longer. In just a few short weeks, many of California’s 6.2 million students will head back to class equipped with notebooks, pencils, flash drives, and dozens more items on the average school supplies list. When you factor in other necessities to keep the state’s nearly 10,000 schools running smoothly—including 180 days of lunch service for those 6.2 million students—you can start to grasp the tremendous challenge of managing the districts’ discards.

    According to the latest Commercial Waste Characterization Study, California schools dispose of roughly 562,442 tons of waste each year. CalRecycle is working to help decrease those disposal numbers with free back-to-school tools that students, parents, and districts can use to save money and protect our natural resources.

    Tools for Schools

    Tools for Parents and Students

    These back-to-school tips can also help schools support California’s groundbreaking efforts to reduce our reliance on landfills, cut our greenhouse gas emissions, and achieve the highest and best use of all materials in California.

     

    Posted on In the Loop by Lance Klug on Jul 31, 2017