Communities Receive $1.6 Million in CalRecycle Grants for Waste Tire Collection Events

Media Contact: Christina Files
(916) 341-6176 | Christina.Files@calrecycle.ca.gov
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

SACRAMENTO – Money from a state-managed recycling fund will give Californians the opportunity to get rid of their old waste tires free of charge—allowing for the recycling and reuse of those tires rather than landfilling or illegal disposal.

Every two years, the Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery (CalRecycle) awards waste tire amnesty grants to local jurisdictions, which then hold collection events for area residents to drop off old tires free of charge. This year, CalRecycle awarded $1.6 million to 38 cities, counties, and other jurisdictions throughout California.

“When residents are made aware of an impending amnesty event, they are less likely to dump their tires illegally,” CalRecycle Director Scott Smithline said. “These grants help local jurisdictions coordinate and prepare for successful events that divert waste tires into recycling programs.”

The Local Government Waste Tire Amnesty Grant Program is designed to deter illegal dumping and stockpiling of waste tires, which can pose a threat to human health and the environment. Improperly managed waste tires are unsightly, become ideal breeding grounds for rodents and mosquitos, which can contribute to the spread of diseases like West Nile Virus. In 2015, California generated 44.2 million waste tires and 80.9 percent were diverted from disposal. Properly managed waste tires can be recycled into products used for various applications such as road surfacing and erosion control.

Grant funds can be used to advertise the collection events and to collect and transport the tires. This is one of several CalRecycle programs funded from a recycling fee charged on every new tire sold in California. There is no cost to the state’s General Fund.

The following is a complete list of jurisdictions that received funding. The maximum award amounts are $40,000 for individual city and county grants and $90,000 for regional grants.

Applicant and Total Award

Butte County: $30,000

City of Ceres: $4,020

City of Coalinga: $6,908

City of Elk Grove: $27,094

City of Fresno: $40,000

City of Hesperia: $34,420

City of Lake Elsinore: $32,620

City of Long Beach: $39,995

City of Los Angeles: $19,000

City of Madera: $90,000

City of Modesto: $25,950

City of Pomona: $8,530

City of Reedley: $9,568

City of Tulare: $7,500

El Dorado County: $89,812

Fresno County: $40,000

Glenn County: $84,000

Humboldt Waste Management Authority: $88,180

Imperial Valley  Resource Management Authority: $53,369

Lake County: $40,000

Lassen Regional Solid Waste Management Authority: $34,928

Mendocino Solid Waste Management Authority : $70,000

Merced County Regional Waste Management Authority: $90,000

Phelan Pinon Hills Community Services District: $28,251

Regional Waste Management Authority: $27,126

Riverside County: $37,737

Rural Counties ESJPA: $90,000

Salinas Valley Solid Waste Authority: $62,832

San Bernardino County: $40,000

San Diego County: $39,500

San Joaquin County: $85,000

Santa Cruz County: $21,097

Siskiyou County: $20,000

Stanislaus County: $53,155

Tehama County: $44,709

Town of Apple Valley: $34,615

Town of Paradise: $30,000

Yolo County: $40,000

Total: $1,619,916

For more information on CalRecycle’s Amnesty Tire Grant program, visit our Tire Grants webpage. For more information on waste tire recycling, visit our Tire Management webpage.

Check out CalRecycle’s website and the department’s In the Loop blog for raw dataprogram information, and California success stories related to the state’s waste reduction, recycling, and greenhouse gas emissions reduction efforts.

— Christina Files
Posted on Jun 29, 2017

Summary: Every two years, the Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery (CalRecycle) awards waste tire amnesty grants to local jurisdictions, which then hold collection events for area residents to drop off old tires free of charge. This year, CalRecycle awarded $1.6 million to 38 cities, counties, and other jurisdictions throughout California.