Listed below are recent posts across all of CalRecyle's blogs.

  • Spotlight: 5 Projects, Laws, and Programs to Watch in 2019

    CalRecycle has a busy year ahead as we work to protect public health and the environment. Check out these new projects, laws, and programs, and stay tuned for regular updates.

    CalRecycle’s Role in Wildfire Debris Cleanup and Recovery

    California suffered several significant wildfires in 2018, and the Governor’s Office of Emergency Services tasked CalRecycle with overseeing the cleanup at the Woolsey and Hill fires in LA and Ventura counties and the Camp Fire in Paradise (Butte County). Read about the cleanup process at our Wildfire Debris Cleanup and Recovery webpage, and check our dashboard maps (Woolsey-Hill fires map and Camp Fire map) for the latest updates.

    New Recycling and Disposal Facility Reporting

    Former Governor Edmund G. Brown signed AB 901 (Gordon, Chapter 746, Statutes of 2015) into law to change how the management of organics, recyclable material, and solid waste are reported to CalRecycle. While the statewide waste characterization reports help CalRecycle better understand the composition of our waste streams, these new reports will help CalRecycle better track and analyze the flow of materials throughout California. CalRecycle will transition away from the current Disposal Reporting System (DRS) to the new Recycling and Disposal Reporting System (RDRS). The registration period for entities required to report via RDRS begins April 1. CalRecycle is scheduled to host workshops on March 20 and 21 to help reporting entities understand their obligations under the new system. See the Recycling and Disposal Facility Reporting AB 901 webpage.

    Statewide Expansion of Organics Recycling

    SB 1383 builds upon California’s leading commitments to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and air pollution by reducing the amount of organic waste sent to landfills. The regulations will go into effect in 2022, and the formal rulemaking process is underway. Check out the Short-Lived Climate Pollutants (SLCP): Organic Waste Methane Emissions Reductions webpage to learn more about the intent of the law. Check out our SLCP rulemaking webpage for more information.

    Pharmaceutical and Sharps Waste Stewardship

    Unwanted and improperly managed pharmaceutical drugs and needles (often called “sharps”) present significant public health, safety, and environmental problems at the end of their useful lives. In 2018, Brown signed SB 212 (Jackson, Chapter 1004, Statutes of 2018) into law to establish safe and convenient disposal options for pharmaceutical drugs and home-generated sharps waste. CalRecycle started the informal regulatory process in January 2019. Read more at the Pharmaceutical and Sharps Waste Stewardship webpage.

    Sustainable Packaging for the State of California

    Brown also signed into law SB 1335 (Allen, Chapter 610, Statues of 2018) , which prohibits food service facilities located in a state-owned facility, operating on or acting as a concessionaire on state-owned property, or under contract to provide food service to a state agency from dispensing prepared food using food service packaging unless it is either recyclable, reusable, or compostable. The first step to implementing this law is clarifying what is reusable, recyclable, or compostable through the regulation process. Read about the law on the Sustainable Packaging for the State of California webpage. The first informal rulemaking workshop is April 10.

    Posted on In the Loop by Christina Files on Mar 21, 2019

  • CalRecycle March Monthly Public Meeting

    small CalRecycle logo

    Show up or tune in to CalRecycle’s monthly public meeting and find out what we’re up to!

    Hear about our upcoming education campaign to increase recycling and reduce contamination in curbside collections, so that material you’re tossing in your bins can actually be recycled into great new things.

    We’ll also discuss some recent grant awards, including a few to support our Beverage Container Recycling (CRV) Program, and a few more to clean up sites under our Solid Waste Disposal and Codisposal Site Cleanup Program.

    Another grant, to Yolo County, will support a project that will use 1.1 million passenger tires to offset the amount of wood chips and soil that would otherwise need to be used as ground cover at its new 20-acre waste-processing facility. That’s quite a few tires that will be put to good use rather than landfilled or illegally stockpiled. Remember that huge pile of tires that burned for years? We do—in fact, that fire was the impetus for our waste tire management program.

    CalRecycle March 2019 Public Meeting
    10 a.m. Tuesday, March 19
    Byron Sher Auditorium, CalEPA Building
    1001 I St., Sacramento, CA

    You can find the full agenda for CalRecycle’s March public meeting here. If you can’t make it in person, join us by webcast (the link will go live shortly before the meeting begins).

    Posted on In the Loop by CalRecycle staff on Mar 18, 2019

  • CalRecycle Awards $71,000 to Clear Illegal Dumpsites

    Local Boy Scout Troop to Help Restore Farm and Ranch Land

    Media Contact: Lance Klug
    (916) 341-6293 Lance.Klug@CalRecycle.ca.gov

    SACRAMENTO – The California Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery is awarding $71,132 in cleanup grants to restore public nature areas and animal grazing land in Lassen and Madera counties. The local sites are overrun with illegally dumped appliances, tires, household hazardous waste, electronic waste, construction scraps, and other debris, posing a threat to public health and the environment.

    “California must protect the farm, ranch and agricultural lands that help feed people and contribute to our economy.” CalRecycle Director Scott Smithline said. “CalRecycle is committed to keeping these open, rural spaces clean and productive for generations to come.”

    CalRecycle’s Farm and Ranch Solid Waste Cleanup and Abatement Grant Program provides up to $1 million annually for the cleanup of illegal solid waste on farm or ranch property where the owner is not responsible for the illegally dumped debris.

    Madera County

    CalRecycle is awarding the Coarsegold Resource Conservation District a $21,132 grant to help clear a stretch of the Willow Creek Trail loop, the Cheapo Saddle Shooting Range, and the Central Camp Road grotto in the county and Sierra National Forest. The sites are on dirt roads with hiking trails and are prone to illegal dumping. A local Boy Scout troop will help support the project by removing recyclables and trash following the cleanup. New garbage and recycling bins, signage and increased monitoring will be put in place to help prevent future dumping.

    Central Camp Road Grotto cleanup site

    The Central Camp Road grotto site will be cleaned up with funding from CalRecycle. 

    Lassen County

    CalRecycle is awarding the Honey Lake Valley Resource Conservation a $50,000 grant to help clear a 45-acre debris field within the 360-acre Bertotti Ranch. The land is used as a cattle, sheep and pig pasture and serves as graze land for these and other livestock throughout the year. The ungated property was unoccupied for decades. Its proximity to a nearby community and public road made it a frequent illegal dumping ground. New fencing and increased monitoring are expected to help prevent future dumping.

    Bertotti Ranch site

    This Bertotti Ranch site will also be cleaned up.

    Under the farm and ranch grant program, cities, counties, federally recognized Native American tribes, and resource conservation districts may apply for up to $200,000 per fiscal year, but no more than $50,000 per site. Grants are funded through the state’s Integrated Waste Management Account, Tire Recycling Management Fund, and Used Oil Recycling Fund. Get automatic updates on new grant cycles, awards, and funding availability by subscribing to CalRecycle’s Farm and Ranch Cleanup Grant listserv.

    Posted on In the Loop by Lance Klug on Feb 28, 2019