Listed below are recent posts across all of CalRecyle's blogs.

  • Local Economies Get Green Boost: $5.3 Million

    Infrastructure Investments Add Jobs, Reduce Waste and Greenhouse Gas Emissions

     

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    SACRAMENTO – The California Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery approved $5.3 million in loans to two California companies to create new jobs, increase recycling infrastructure, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions in California. The financing will help Peninsula Plastics Recycling, Inc. of Turlock (Stanislaus County) and U.S. Rubber Recycling, Inc. of Grand Terrace (San Bernardino County) expand their workforce while making use of an additional 17,300 tons of California-generated waste tires and plastic each year.

    “These local investments benefit all Californians by transforming a potential waste stream into a supply stream for our businesses, creating jobs, protecting our planet, and reducing our dependence on unstable foreign markets,” CalRecycle Director Scott Smithline said. In addition to conserving oil and other natural resources, manufacturing products from recycled materials requires less energy and results in fewer GHG emissions than making products from virgin materials.”

    CalRecycle Support Available for California Recycling Businesses

    CalRecycle provides financial and technical assistance to help reuse- and recycling-based businesses develop and prosper in California.

    • CalRecycle’s Greenhouse Gas Reduction Loan Program is part of California Climate Investments, a statewide program that puts billions of Cap-and-Trade dollars to work reducing greenhouse gas emissions, strengthening the economy, and improving public health and the environment, particularly in disadvantaged communities. Through direct low-interest loans, CalRecycle financing helps California businesses expand capacity or establish new facilities that manufacture organics, fiber, plastic, or glass waste materials into new products.
    • CalRecycle’s Recycling Market Development Zone Loan Program combines recycling with state and local economic development incentives to fuel new businesses, expand existing ones, and create additional markets for recycled-content products. The RMDZ program provides loans, technical assistance, and product marketing to recycling businesses located within one of the state’s 40 designated recycling market development zones.

    Peninsula Plastics and U.S. Rubber Recycling -- $5.3 million

    Posted on In the Loop by Lance Klug on Jan 28, 2019

  • Combating Climate Change in California

    California has made combatting climate change a top priority for our state, and for good reason. Our communities are already battling the negative effects of climate change that endanger public health and the environment. Fortunately, CalRecycle and other state departments are taking steps to reduce its effects.

    Recycling for Climate

    Recycling combats climate change in several ways. First, it reduces the need to extract raw materials to manufacture new products, which reduces energy use and the release of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases into our atmosphere. For example, every 10 pounds of aluminum you recycle prevents 37 pounds of carbon emissions.

    SB 1383 (Lara, Chapter 395, Statutes of 2016) establishes a target to achieve a 75 percent reduction of currently landfilled organic waste by 2025 and diverting this material into recovery activities. It also requires that cities and counties provide organics recycling services to residents and businesses, implement an edible food recovery program, and purchase recycled organics products like compost and renewable natural gas. SB 1383 will also generate thousands of new, locally based recycling jobs.

    Recycling organic materials like yard and food waste prevents methane gas emissions. When landfilled, organic waste decomposes and releases methane into the atmosphere. This is a big deal, because methane is a super pollutant at least 80 times more powerful than carbon dioxide. Fortunately, organic materials are easily recycled into beneficial products like compost, which enriches the nutrients and water-holding capacity of soils, and renewable natural gas, which can power vehicles without using fossil fuels.

    California Climate Investments: Greenhouse Gas Reduction Grants and Loans

    CalRecycle established the Greenhouse Gas Reduction Grant and Loan Programs to provide financial incentives for capital investments in infrastructure designed to address climate change and other environmental goals. This includes aerobic composting, anaerobic digestion, and recycling and manufacturing facilities that will reduce greenhouse gas emissions. One priority is to realize environmental and economic benefits in disadvantaged and low-income communities. “Putting Cap-and-Trade Dollars to Work for California” highlights past projects and benefits to local communities.

    California is experiencing the effects of climate change with cycling droughts, reduced Sierra Nevada snowpack (which provides 60 percent of the state’s water), longer and more extreme fire seasons, and rising sea levels. CalRecycle is directing many efforts to reduce and reverse these dramatic changes to our climate. From regulating the management of materials to their highest and best use, to investing in the necessary infrastructure California needs to have a closed-loop recycling system, CalRecycle is making a significant difference with tangible actions to address climate change. But perhaps more than anything, we value our partnership with the people of California who play a vital role in recycling for climate by adopting the three Rs: reduce, reuse, and recycle. Learn more about CalRecycle’s efforts to combat climate change at our Climate Change webpage.

    —Christina Files

    Posted on In the Loop by Christina Files on Jan 21, 2019

  • CalRecycle Cleanup Grants Announced

    Resighini Rancheria to Receive Nearly $50,000 for Floodplain Cleanup

    The California Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery has awarded the Resighini Rancheria a $49,237 Farm and Ranch Solid Waste Cleanup and Abatement grant to clear an illegal dumpsite in the Klamath River estuary. The remote property on a Klamath River floodplain is currently home to illegally dumped vehicles, trailers, boats, appliances, propane tanks, tires, and other debris. In addition to the effects on wildlife, the stripped vehicles and appliances have increased contamination concerns on the property, which is zoned for agricultural use.

    The Resighini Rancheria will use grant funds to remediate the property and take steps to prevent illegal dumping in the future.

    These items were part of the clutter at an illegal dumpsite on the Klamath River estuary within the Resighini Rancheria.

    CalRecycle also awarded the Mariposa County Resource Conservation District a $5,630 Farm and Ranch Cleanup grant to clear tires, wire, metal, wood waste, furniture, and other household trash illegally dumped near the Mariposa County community of Jerseydale. U.S. Forest Service workers came across the half-acre site within the Sierra National Forest and requested cleanup assistance from the district. The land is typically used for a variety of recreational and agriculture uses including seasonal cattle grazing, hunting, and hiking.

    CalRecycle’s Farm and Ranch Solid Waste Cleanup and Abatement Grant Program provides up to $1 million annually for the cleanup of illegal solid waste sites on farm or ranch property where the owner is not responsible for the illegal disposal. Under the program, cities, counties, federally recognized Native American tribes, and resource conservation districts may apply for up to $200,000 per fiscal year but no more than $50,000 per site. Grants are funded through the state’s Integrated Waste Management Account, Tire Recycling Management Fund, and Used Oil Recycling Fund.

    Get automatic updates on new grant cycles, awards, and funding availability by subscribing to CalRecycle’s Farm and Ranch Cleanup Grant listserv.

    Posted on In the Loop by Lance Klug on Nov 21, 2018