Listed below are recent posts across all of CalRecyle's blogs.

  • California Counties Find New Use for Old Tires

    CalRecycle Funds Local Projects that Utilize 666,000 Recycled Waste Tires

    SACRAMENTO – The California Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery (CalRecycle) recently awarded $410,364 in grants for civil engineering projects in four counties that will use recycled California waste tires in place of conventional construction materials. California generates an estimated 42 million waste tires each year. CalRecycle’s Tire-Derived Aggregate Grant Program promotes the recycling and reuse of California-generated waste tires to keep them out of landfills or illegal dumpsites.

    “The use of TDA in civil engineering projects is a win for California’s environment and its economy,” CalRecycle Director Scott Smithline said. “Rather than landfill these tires or create stockpiles that can lead to fires and other public health threats, California is making use of a recycled material that has proven to perform well for these types of projects.”

    Tire-derived aggregate is a low-cost, lightweight, and fast-draining product suitable for use in civil engineering applications such as retaining wall backfill, landslide stabilization, and various beneficial uses at landfills (video). The following projects received funding for the third and final TDA grant solicitation of fiscal year 2017-18.

    • Sacramento County: $77,220. Use 3,960 tons of tire-derived aggregate to construct roadways and trenches at the county’s Kiefer Landfill. Project will use approximately 396,000 waste tires. 
    • Santa Barbara County: $158,241. Use 935 tons of tire-derived aggregate for retaining wall repair of  the Ortega Ridge roadway in Summerland. Project will use approximately 93,500 waste tires.
    • Tuolumne County: $120,082. Use 811 tons of tire-derived aggregate for landslide repair project on Italian Bar and Buchanan roads. Project will use approximately 81,100 waste tires. 
    • Riverside County: $54,821. Use 2,735 tons of tire-derived aggregate to construct trenches at 32 sites within the Badlands Landfill in Moreno Valley and Lamb Canyon Landfill in Beaumont. Project will use approximately 95,400 waste tires. 
    • Total: $410,364. Projects will use approximately 666,000waste tires.

    The following projects are recommend for awards should additional funds become available.

    • Riverside County: $102,384. Funding to complete landfill projects described above. Project will use another 178,100 waste tires, approximately.
    • Merced Coounty Regional Waste Management Authority. $106,982. Use 1,463 tons of tire-derived aggregate to construct trenches at the  Highway 59 Landfill. Project will use approximately 146,300 waste tires.
    • Total: $209,366. Projects will use approximately 324,400 waste tires.

    Eligible projects must be located in California and use at least 500 tons (equivalent of 50,000 passenger tires) of California-generated waste tires. Subscribe to CalRecycle’s TDA Grant Program listservfor notifications about funding availability, applicant and project eligibility, and application due dates.

    CalRecycle’s Tire-Derived Aggregate Grant Program is funded through a fee on new tires sold in California

    Posted on In the Loop by CalRecycle Staff on Apr 5, 2018

  • California Fights Climate Change by Feeding the Hungry

    $9.4 Million Awarded to 31 Projects that Feed Californians, Reduce Food Waste 

    Media Contact: Lance Klug
    (916) 341-6293
    lance.klug@calrecycle.ca.gov

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    SACRAMENTO – The California Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery has announced the first award recipients for its newFood Waste Prevention and Rescue Grant Program. As part of California’s comprehensive strategy to combat climate change, CalRecycle awarded $9.4 million to 31 projects throughout the state that:

    • Decrease the estimated 6 million tons of food waste landfilled in California each year, and
    • Increase the state’s capacity to collect, transport, store, and distribute more food for the roughly 1 in 8 Californians who are food insecure.

    When sent to landfills, food and other organic waste decomposes and generates methane, a potent greenhouse gas with a heat-trapping effect at least 86 times greater than carbon dioxide over a 20-year span. 

    “Bolstering California’s food recovery infrastructure will help feed communities in need, create new jobs, and result in significant greenhouse gas reductions,” CalRecycle Director Scott Smithline said. “Our hope is that these programs will inspire similar efforts throughout California.”

    CalRecycle’s Food Waste Prevention and Rescue Grant Program is part of California Climate Investments, a statewide initiative that puts billions of Cap-and-Trade dollars to work reducing greenhouse gas emissions, strengthening the economy, and improving public health and the environment—particularly in disadvantaged communities.

    To be eligible for grant funding, projects must be located in California; result in permanent, annual, and measurable reductions in greenhouse gas emissions; and increase the quantity of California-generated food materials prevented, reduced, or rescued from disposal. Note: Many of the following grant recipients serve multiple counties.

    Here is a list of the grant funding recipients:

    • Alameda County Waste Management Authority, Alameda County: $500,00
    • Associated Students, Inc., Los Angeles County: $65,340
    • City of Riverside, Riverside County: $209,736
    • City of Santa Monica, Los Angeles County, $100,000
    • Cityteam-Oakland, Alameda County: $96,429
    • Food Bank Coalition of SLO County, San Luis Obispo County: $100,000
    • Food Bank for Monterey County, Monterey County: $475,072
    • Food Finders, Inc., Los Angeles County: $100,000
    • Food Forward, Los Angeles County: $500,000
    • Jesus Provides Our Daily Bread dba Jesus Center, Butte County: $499,789
    • Joint Venture Silicon Valley Network, Santa Clara County: $313,000
    • Los Angeles Regional Food Bank, Los Angeles County: $386,960
    • ProduceGood, San Diego County: $100,000
    • Re-plate, Inc., Alameda County: $299,100
    • San Diego Food System Alliance, a Fiscal Project of Leah’s Pantry, San Diego County: $500,000
    • St. Francis Center, Los Angeles County: $100,000
    • The Midnight Mission, Los Angeles County: $100,000
    • University of California, Merced, Merced County: $100,000
    • *Waste Not OC Coalition, a Fiscal Project of OneOC,Merced County: $339,574
    • White Pony Express, Contra Costa County: $115,000

    Total (FY 2016-2017 Funds): $5,000,000

    • City of Culver City, Los Angeles County: $497,144
    • City of Richmond, Contra Costa County: $327,500
    • Desert Manna, San Bernardino County: $470,450
    • El Dorado County: $277,140
    • Fresno Metropolitan Ministry, Fresno County: $500,000
    • Imperial Valley Food Bank, Imperial County: $500,000
    • Kern County: $191,963
    • Los Angeles Conservation Corps, Los Angeles County: $375,206
    • Peninsula Food Runners, San Francisco County: $200,000
    • Strong Food/L.A. Kitchen, Inc., Los Angeles County: $389,387
    • Ventura County: $499,293
    • *Waste Not OC Coalition, a Fiscal Project of OneOC,Orange County: $160,426

    Total (FY 2017-2018 Funds): $4,388,509

    *Project funded with combination of FY 2016-17 and FY 2017-18 allocations

     

    Eligible applicants for CalRecycle’s Food Waste Prevention and Rescue Grant Program include cities, counties, and other local agencies; businesses; California universities and colleges; nonprofit organizations; and qualifying Indian Tribes. Applicants may submit cooperative or regional applications with no more than four participants to achieve food recovery projections. 

    Find out more about CalRecycle’s California Climate Investments grants and loans and read stories from other grant recipients about how they’re putting Cap-and-Trade dollars to work for California’s economy, environment, and the health of our communities.

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    Posted on In the Loop by Lance Klug on Feb 1, 2018

  • More Jobs, Less Pollution: CalRecycle Awards $24 Million in Grants to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    Cap-and-trade dollars boost local economies with 21st Century infrastructure projects

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    Media Contact: Lance Klug
    (916) 371-6293 |lance.klug@calrecycle.ca.gov                                                                              FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    SACRAMENTO—As an integral part of the state’s far-reaching effort to slow and reverse the effects of climate change, the California Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery has awarded $24 million in grants to help convert more of the state’s organic waste (food, green waste, and wood) into renewable energy and compost.

    “These latest climate investments provide a much-needed boost to California’s organic waste recycling capacity, which the state must roughly double to meet its greenhouse gas reduction and 75 percent recycling goals,” CalRecycle Director Scott Smithline said. “These infrastructure projects will diversify our local economies—creating durable green jobs that can’t be outsourced.”

    When sent to landfills, organic waste decomposes and generates methane, a short-lived climate pollutant 70 times more potent than carbon dioxide. CalRecycle helps fund construction, renovation, or expansion of facilities in California that recycle organic material into value-added products like compost or renewable energy. 

    CalRecycle’s Organics Grant program  is part of California Climate Investments, a statewide program that puts billions of cap-and-trade dollars to work reducing greenhouse gas emissions, strengthening the economy, and improving human health and the environment—particularly in disadvantaged communities.

    Of the $24 million allocated to CalRecycle’s Organics Grant program in 2016-17:

    • $12 million was dedicated to digestion projects, which turn organic waste into renewable energy and soil amendments. Maximum award: $4 million
    • $12 million was dedicated to compost operations—$3 million of which was allocated specifically for projects in rural areas. Maximum award: $3 million

    Demand in CalRecycle’s Organics Grant Program well exceeded the $24 million in available funds for 2016-17, with 35 eligible applicants requesting $88.6 million. CalRecycle granted funds to the 10 highest scoring applicants based on criteria of greenhouse gas reductions, the amount of organic material diverted from landfills, benefits to disadvantaged communities, and project readiness.

    Many infrastructure project proposals included funding for food rescue efforts to recover landfill-destined, edible food for Californians in need. Food waste prevention remains the most environmentally beneficial way to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. While food rescue was not among the scoring criteria for the organics grant, it was a consideration for evaluating benefits to disadvantaged communities.

    FY 2016-17 Organics Grant Program Recipients

    Anaerobic Digestion  Projects:

    County Sanitation Districts  of Los Angeles County

    Los Angeles County

    $4,000,000

    Equipment upgrades to  complete organic food waste pre-processing and anaerobic digestion system.  Grantee will convert regional food waste into renewable gas for  transportation fuel. Includes dedicated funds for partnership with a local  food rescue entity.

    • New Jobs? Yes
    • New Organic Waste Diverted? Yes
    • Food Rescue Component? Yes

    HZIU Kompogas SLO, Inc.

    San Luis Obispo County

    $4,000,000 

    Design, build, and operate  a Kompogas anaerobic digestion facility. Grantee will convert regional  organic waste into renewable electricity and compost. Includes dedicated  funds for partnership with Valley Food Bank.

    • New Jobs? Yes
    • New Organic Waste Diverted? Yes
    • Food Rescue Component? Yes

    Rialto Bioenergy Facility,  LLC

    San Bernardino County

    $4,000,000 

    Equipment upgrades to in-vessel  digestion facility to process regional food waste into renewable electricity.  Includes dedicated funds for partnership with Helping Hands Pantry.

    • New Jobs? Yes
    • New Organic Waste Diverted? Yes
    • Food Rescue Component? Yes

    Compost Projects:

    City of San Diego

    San Diego County

    $3,000,000 

    Equipment upgrade of  current windrow composting facility to a covered aerated static pile system.  Will enable regional expansion of food waste composting program. Includes  dedicated funds for partnership with Kitchens for Good.

    • New Jobs? Yes
    • New Organic Waste Diverted? Yes
    • Food Rescue Component? Yes

    Mid Valley Recycling, LLC

    Fresno County

    Expansion of current  aerated static pile composting system to support new organic waste recycling  programs in the community.

    $1,875,000 

    • New Jobs? Yes
    • New Organic Waste Diverted? Yes
    • Food Rescue Component? No

    Salinas Valley Solid Waste  Authority

    Monterey County

    $1,341,865 

    Expansion of current  organic chip and grind facility to include a food waste composting operation.  Includes equipment upgrades and dedicated funds for partnership with Food  Bank for Monterey County.

    • New Jobs? Yes
    • New Organic Waste Diverted? Yes
    • Food Rescue Component? Yes

    Recology Yuba-Sutter

    Yuba County

    First of three -phase  project to design, build, and operate new covered aerated static pile compost  system to recycle regional green waste.

    $2,783,135 

    • New Jobs? Yes
    • New Organic Waste Diverted? Yes
    • Food Rescue Component? No

    Rural Compost Projects:

    Napa Recycling & Waste  Services, LLC

    Napa County

    Equipment upgrades to  recover more food waste for grantee’s existing compost operation. Includes  dedicated funds for partnership with Emergency Food Bank of Stockton.

    $541,700 

    • New Jobs? Yes
    • New Organic Waste Diverted? Yes
    • Food Rescue Component? Yes

    South Lake Refuse Company,  LLC

    Lake County

    Equipment upgrades to  expand existing green waste composting site to include food waste composting.  Includes dedicated funds for partnership with Sacramento Food Bank and Family  Services.

    $1,218,026

    • New Jobs? Yes
    • New Organic Waste Diverted? Yes
    • Food Rescue Component? Yes

    West Coast Waste

    Madera County

    Design, build, and operate  new aerated static pile composting system to recycle regional organic waste.  An on-site learning center is also planned.

    $1,240,274 

    • New Jobs? Yes
    • New Organic Waste Diverted? Yes
    • Food Rescue Component? No

    Total: $24,000,000

    Eligible applicants for CalRecycle’s Organics Grant program include cities, counties, and other local agencies; businesses; California universities and colleges; nonprofit organizations; and qualifying Indian Tribes.

    Learn more about CalRecycle’s new Food Waste Prevention and Rescue Grant Program, California’s new push to recover edible food for hungry people before it becomes waste, and the state’s latest investments to turn food and other organic waste into renewable energy or increase compost capacity and demand in California.

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    Posted on In the Loop by Lance Klug on Aug 17, 2017