Listed below are recent posts across all of CalRecyle's blogs.

  • Our Audience Asks: What Is the 50/50/50 Rule?

    Our Audience Asks: What is the 50/50/50 Rule?

    Last week, I received a phone call from a fellow Californian and avid recycler asking about the 50/50/50 rule at recycling centers. For those of you who don’t know what that is, I’ll get to it shortly. After the call, I started wondering what people actually know about the Beverage Container Recycling Program regulations, California law, and rules made by recycling centers for operational efficiency. So, let’s clear up some confusion.

    California Refund Value (CRV)

    Most people know what this is, but just in case, here’s a refresher! CRV is the amount a customer pays when they purchase beverages in eligible containers like aluminum, plastic, and glass. You should see this amount on your store receipt. This amount is paid back to customers once they return the eligible containers to a certified recycling center or dealer (the place where you bought the container). The amount for each container is 5 cents for anything under 24 ounces and 10 cents for anything 24 ounces or greater.

    Certified Recycling Centers 

    Recycling centers are privately owned businesses that are certified by us, CalRecycle. And just like any other company, they’re in the business of making money, so you may have noticed some closing in recent years because it’s hard to turn a profit when global markets take a downward turn. These privately owned businesses are allowed to make certain rules about collecting recyclables for business operation efficiency, but they must follow certain regulations set by CalRecycle, and CalRecycle must follow the laws set by the State of California. That also means if you have a complaint or concern about a specific recycling center or dealer, you can call us at 1-800-Recycle to file a formal complaint. Our hotline staff really appreciate when you’re polite to them! I know because I sit right next to them and hear what they have to go through--it’s not always pretty. After your complaint is filed, our department will follow up with that center to resolve the issue. 

    50/50/50 Rule

    Recycling centers are allowed to pay by weight as a matter of business efficiency, but if you request to have the recycling center count each container so you can redeem the exact amount you paid, California law allows you that option. The recycling center is required to comply with that rule. But, in order to keep business moving, recyclers are only required to pay by “count” for 50 of each container type per visit, for a total of 150 CRV-eligible containers. If you bring more, they have the right to pay for the additional material by weight. And just to ensure the recycling center attendant and people in line behind you don’t roll their eyes at you, sort your containers ahead of time and let them know beforehand that you want to receive payment by count. 

    For more information about Beverage Container Recycling visit our FAQ page

    Posted on In the Loop by TC Clark on Aug 1, 2019

  • Baseball Teams Make a Play for Less Waste

    It’s summertime, the kids are out of school, and families are packing up and heading to the ballpark for a baseball game.

    When you get to the game, it’s pretty much eating time. Sure, watching batters hit and pitchers pitch may be fun, but, come on, the little ones love going because they’re eating a hot dog, ice cream, or cotton candy. Heck, it’s tempting to get even more food during the seventh-inning stretch while hearing “Take Me Out to the Ball Game”, including this beauty from the lyrics: “Buy me some peanuts and Cracker Jack.” 

    tray of ballpark food -- hotdog, chips, soft drink

    But, recently, after watching a game with the family, I noticed something: trash underneath the seats—a lot of it.

    So, how much garbage is generated during a baseball game? Obviously, it depends on how many fans attend. But in 2010, the Los Angeles Daily News reported that 3.11 tons of trash were produced during a home game at Dodger Stadium. That’s quite a bit going to the landfill.

    Some major league and minor league teams are trying to change that. Those teams have created environmentally focused programs to promote recycling and composting, as well as overall sustainability. As part of the San Francisco Giants’ “Green Initiative,” the organization recycles or composts items like cans, bottles, plastic cups, cardboard, paper, wood pallets, electronic components, light bulbs, batteries, cooking grease, food waste, and grass clippings. The Giants claim 95.08 percent of the waste at their ballpark in 2016 was diverted from the landfill through their recycling and composting program.

    The San Diego Padres also have a recycling and waste diversion program. They have been promoting digital ticketing instead of paper tickets to fans while serving ballpark food with service trays and packaging made of recycled materials and biodegradable materials. Plastic drinking straws have also been replaced with paper straws.

    These programs only work if fans are conscientious about it. In other words, don’t just throw trash underneath the seats, but make an effort to find a garbage, recycling, or compost bin and dump it there. You can even collect your peanut shells and compost them yourself. (Here’s a recent blog about how to start composting.)

    We can all have fun watching the game, eating Cracker Jack and being mindful of our environment at the same time. That’s a home run in my scorebook. 

    Posted on In the Loop by Syd Fong on Jun 20, 2019

  • Planet Protecting-Prom: Dance the Night Away Eco-Guilt-Free

    Sandy and Danny dancing in the movie Grease

    Corsages and cummerbunds mark prom season just before the end of the school year. Soon students will be shopping for dresses, tuxes, and limos, but at what cost to the environment? If you’re a freshman to the world of sustainability, take note of these tips for a planet-protecting prom.

    Various prom dresses

    Give Fast Fashion the Slip

    It can be difficult to avoid those inexpensive clothing items when you or your teenager are fashion-forward on a budget. But, armed with the knowledge that the fashion industry (especially fast fashion) is one of the main contributors to landfill waste, pollution, and unfair labor practices, it might be a little easier to give up those bargain garments. Instead, try purchasing something secondhand. Just because it was previously owned, that does not mean it is cheap, tacky, or unsophisticated. In fact, most prom dresses are only worn once, so it’s likely any “used” dress will be in excellent condition—not to mention less expensive. You can also get creative and refashion a secondhand item that has potential. Don’t have enough room in your closet or not as creative as you’d like to be? Find a dress rental company in your area—tuxes are rented, so why can’t a dress be? Another option can be a formal clothing exchange between friends, an exchange program, or even your library—yes, your library! There are also plenty of places to donate your dress when you’re done with it.

    Olive Oyl applying makeup

    Makeover Your Cosmetic Bag

    Looking your best doesn’t stop at your outfit, and it shouldn’t come at the expense of the planet. Whether you or your teen wears makeup or simple moisturizer, applies lots of hair product or just needs a razor to get rid of unwanted stubble, there is an earth-friendly option for everyone. Start by asking what cosmetics and beauty accessories are made of—plastic or natural ingredients? Biodegradable or single-use? What about excess packaging? Look for zero-waste companies, or DIY your cosmetics.

    Limo driving to dance

    Limopool

    If you or your teen can afford to rent a limo, make sure to get as many passengers as possible. This will help offset the carbon emissions created by driving multiple cars, and it can also help bring down the cost of the rental. If a limo isn’t in the cards, try regular carpooling or even a pedicab if the venue is nearby. No one expects anyone to ride their bike in their formals, but a pedicab or even a horse-drawn carriage can be a fun and eco-friendly option if the dance is nearby.

    Peter Parker handing a corsage to his date

    Corsage Compost

    After the night is over, the formal footwear is kicked off and it’s time to hit the hay, don’t toss your boutoniere or corsage in the trash. If you don’t plan on hanging on to your flowers as a keepsake, compost it or throw it in your yard waste bin minus the ribbons, pins, and other decorations—you can always reuse those, but they don’t belong in the pile with other organic waste.

    Now get out there and promenade that planet-protecting way, knowing you did the right thing for future prom-goers!

    Posted on In the Loop by TC Clark on Apr 8, 2019