Listed below are recent posts across all of CalRecyle's blogs.

  • CalRecycle Launches New Recycling and Disposal Reporting System

    CalRecycle Launches New Recycling and Disposal Reporting System


    As a state with more than 40 million residents, California generates a lot of waste—to the tune of 77.2 million tons in 2017 alone. In 2019, CalRecycle launched a new Recycling and Disposal Reporting System to track how organics, recyclable material, and solid waste are managed throughout the state. Regulated businesses have registered and, in some cases, have already started reporting data to CalRecycle. The department expects to release the first quarterly report in January 2020.

    Under the previous reporting system, information was reported to counties and regional agencies that aggregated the data before sending it to CalRecycle. To better understand the composition of our waste streams, CalRecycle supplemented that data with detailed waste characterization studies.

    The new system builds on these efforts by requiring recycling and composting businesses, facilities, and operations to report directly to CalRecycle, thereby streamlining the submittal process and helping CalRecycle not only understand what is being recycled, but also where in the state materials are managed. With better data, CalRecycle can more accurately assess the waste and recycling industry landscape in order to identify specific challenges and promulgate potential solutions.  

    Regulated businesses are starting to report their data in incremental steps as materials flow through collection centers and transfer stations to recyclers, composters, and landfills. Quarter Three (July-September) 2019 data will be fully reported by the end of December 2019, and CalRecycle will analyze and report the results in January 2020.

    Posted on In the Loop by Christina Files on Oct 24, 2019

  • Through the Lens: A Photographic Look at CalRecycle's Programs

    You’ve heard it before--a picture is worth a thousand words! And at CalRecycle we have thousands of pictures (you don’t have to do the math) because we have a multitude of programs, events, and projects we’re constantly working on. As the unofficial photographer here at CalRecycle headquarters, I’m fortunate enough to witness and document the inner workings of the department. Here is a small sampling of my favorite photos from the past five years. If you like what you see, don’t forget to follow California EPA on Instagram--we contribute images often and you can see what our partner departments are up to as well!

    Facility Tours

    Wildfire Cleanups

    Education and the Environment Initiative

    Environmental events

    Posted on In the Loop by TC Clark on Aug 19, 2019

  • Food Rescue Group Receives Second CalRecycle Grant

    CalRecycle has awarded $266,795 to the Kern County Public Health Services Department to expand its Waste Hunger Not Food program, which collects unserved food from local schools and restaurants and distributes it in local neighborhoods.

    The funds will be used for a refrigerated box truck and walk-in refrigeration to store food safely. The box trucks will allow Kern County to partner with food donors that donate food in large quantities. Since Waste Hunger Not Food launched in September 2018, the group has rescued more than 304,600 pounds of food.

    CalRecycle’s Food Waste Prevention and Rescue Grant Program aims to reduce methane emissions by keeping edible food out of California landfills and redistributing it to the 1 in 8 Californians (including 1 in 5 children) who are food-insecure. Many of these families live in disadvantaged communities, which means they have a disproportionate exposure to pollution and less access to healthy food.

    Kern County partners with City Serve, a local nonprofit that brings churches together to serve the community. Waste Hunger Not Food uses refrigerated trucks to collect food from restaurants and schools and quickly deliver it to churches that have been trained in food safety best practices.

    Churches are often located within residential neighborhoods, making it easy and convenient for volunteers to distribute the food. Some church volunteers simply carry signs through the neighborhoods that say “Free Food,” and word of mouth travels quickly. City Serve churches distribute food with no restrictions on how much food people can take.     

    This is the second grant CalRecycle has awarded to Kern County for the Waste Hunger Not Food program. The first grant for $191,963 was awarded in fiscal year 2016-17 and enabled the county to buy several refrigerated trucks to collect and transport donated food to distribute to the needy.

    The Waste Hunger Not Food mission aligns with the goals outlined in SB 1383, which requires California to reduce the disposal of organic waste (like food and yard waste) and divert at least 20 percent of edible food to food rescue organizations. Although SB 1383 regulations don’t go into effect until Jan. 1, 2022, the program is giving schools and businesses a head start on compliance by donating edible food they would otherwise send to a landfill.

    Women loading refrigerated truck with donated food

    See the "Waste Hunger Not Food Overview Video"

    Posted on In the Loop by Christina Files on Jul 11, 2019