Listed below are recent posts across all of CalRecyle's blogs.

  • Yolo County Prepares for SB 1383 Implementation with Launch of New Anaerobic Composter

    organic food scraps and hands holding compost

    Yolo County began operating a new anaerobic composter on Oct.1 that can recycle 52,000 tons of organic waste each year into compost, biofuel, and electricity. 

     The facility will keep that organic material out of the county landfill. In landfills, organic waste decomposes and generates methane, which is a major contributor to climate change.

     Instead, food waste, grass clippings, and other organic material collected from local businesses and residents is delivered to the anaerobic composting facility, a 10-acre spot with seven “cells,” at the Yolo County Central Landfill site. 

     When the organic material is delivered to this site, it is ground up and deposited into cells. Each cell is sealed by spraying the surface with a mixture of cement, fibers, and polymer. Once the bacteria-rich liquid is pumped into the cell, the anaerobic digestion process takes place, and in less than six months, biogas is finally produced.

     “Moisture is removed from the biogas produced, and it’s injected into an internal combustion engine that burns the gas, which creates electricity,” said Ramin Yazdani, Director of Yolo County Integrated Waste Management.  “The electricity goes on the grid and is sold to SMUD (Sacramento Municipal Utility District).”

     After methane production has dropped off, the is operated aerobically, utilizing the aeration piping system. Air is injected into the cells to aerate the digestate material for a two-week aerobic digestion phase. This creates compost. 

     The material is then excavated, cured, and screened of contamination. Once the process is complete, the county will sell the compost to residents and businesses. 

     Compost has many beneficial uses, including as a soil amendment and in erosion control. Learn more about compost on our website.

     In 2007, Yolo County received a $200,000 CalRecycle grant to run a pilot project that broke down 2,000 tons of organic waste in a smaller cell.

     “That created the basis of our current design,” Ramin said, “and it showed us operational challenges that we had to learn from in order to design and operate a better system.”

    Posted on In the Loop by Syd Fong on Nov 18, 2019

  • Fall Into Composting

    Dry leaves, twigs, paper, and branches are powerful sources of carbon for compost piles.

     

    Autumn is finally here, and the leaves are beginning to change colors. Pretty soon, people will be raking bright orange and yellow leaves from their lawns. It’s the perfect time of year to start composting – if you start now, you’ll have finished compost in time for your spring garden and flower beds.

    Compost is an organic material made from recycled green and brown materials (like landscape trimmings and branches). Pile these up in a mound or toss them into a compost drum barrel, and pretty soon you will have a robust soil amendment for your garden. You can find more information on our website about home composting.

    Compost has many benefits for homeowners. It retains soil moisture, which is especially helpful during the summer. It keeps weed growth down, which makes gardening much easier. Compost also provides nutrients to the soil, reducing the need for fertilizers. It even adds carbon to the soil, which directly combats climate change.

    Check out our Compost: Getting Started video for more information.

    YouTube video. Compost: Getting Started
    Posted on In the Loop by Christina Files on Oct 17, 2019

  • New Law Bans Hotels from Providing Personal Care Products in Small Plastic Bottles

    We’ve all seen and sometimes used them: those tiny plastic bottles of personal care products that hotels provide to guests. Although many of us have forsaken the novelty of these tiny bottles by bringing along our favorite care products when we travel, they have persisted on hotel bathroom sinks throughout the world. Thanks to a recently signed law, hotels, bed and breakfasts, and vacation rentals in California will be prohibited from providing these to their guests starting in 2023.

    California has a big problem with plastic and packaging. Packaging alone accounts for about 25 percent of the trash we generate throughout the state. And it’s hard to forget the garbage patches in our oceans. In 2011, California set a goal to recycle 75 percent of our waste, which requires that we look at ways to make recycling more convenient for consumers and ways to reduce the amount of plastic and packaging that is available in the marketplace by replacing them with reusable or eco-friendly options. 

    In support of this large waste reduction goal, Gov. Gavin Newsom signed AB 1162 (Kalra, Chapter 687, Statutes of 2019) into law, which prohibits hotels and other lodging establishments from providing personal care products like shampoo, conditioner, soap, and lotion in small plastic bottles. The law defines “small bottles” as those containing less than 6 ounces of liquid that are not intended to be reusable. 

    AB 1162, like many waste management and recycling laws, establishes a phased-in approach. The law requires large establishments with more than 50 rooms to remove these products in 2023. The following year, smaller establishments with fewer rooms will have to follow suit. 

    Laws like this may seem trivial, but they make a significant difference in waste reduction. Before California’s plastic bag ban went into effect in 2017, plastic bags comprised 8 to 10 percent of litter collected along California’s coastal areas. After the ban was implemented, the percentage dropped to 3.87 percent. Every little bit helps in protecting the health of Californians and the environment. 

     

    Posted on In the Loop by Christina Files on Oct 11, 2019