Listed below are recent posts across all of CalRecyle's blogs.

  • California Resource Recovery Association: A Culture of Zero Waste

    CalRecycle staff speaking at podiums, speaking to conference members, and an outdoor group photo.

    Since 1974, the nonprofit organization California Resource Recovery Association has been working toward a more sustainable California through promoting product stewardship, waste prevention, and recycling. The group’s annual conference for which we are a sponsor, brings together cities, counties, councilmembers, businesses, nonprofit organizations, and industry professionals to network and discuss environmental issues. Every year, CalRecycle staff and guest speakers offer a cornucopia of information about policies, practices, and studies at comprehensive educational and plenary sessions.

    At this year’s conference, we participated in four panels on topics ranging from e-waste and grants to statewide recycling to educate attendees about upcoming regulations, funding programs, and waste management practices. We even got to meet Ryan Hickman, the 10-year-old mini-mogul who has taken the recycling world by storm by starting his own business at the age of 3! Other speakers included Timothy Bouldry of the International Solid Waste Association, which runs a scholarship program for children living in dumpsites across the world; and Froilan Grate, who is the executive director of GAIA Philippines, which educates and promotes community-based waste management and construction of material recovery facilities.

    Posted on In the Loop by - TC Clark on Aug 22, 2019

  • Say "I Do" to an Eco-Friendly Wedding

    Say

    Summer is wedding season! While it’s a time for love, family, friends, and happiness, weddings can also lead to a lot of waste. The good news is you have the power to prevent it! Whether you’re planning a wedding for a future date or you’re putting the final touches on your upcoming summer nuptials, these tips can help you tie the knot the sustainable way.

    Close to the Heart

    Destination weddings are an effective way to combine honeymoons, get away from your usual surroundings, and cut down on the guest list (not everyone is willing to travel to the Bahamas for a few days). But traveling to exotic, far-off lands can also be taxing on the planet due to emissions from planes, trains, and automobiles. If possible, opt for a venue closer to home where guests won’t have to travel far and can carpool together. Outdoor venues are also a good option—let the sun be your light source during the day, and use solar-charged lights in the evening.

    Invitation Only

    It’s 2019—why are we still sending things via snail mail? OK, a wedding is a little different since it’s a special occasion, but if you want to cut down on paper waste and costs, sending out an evite is another viable option. Paperless invitations can still be elegant, classy, and unique while being cost-effective and wasteless. If there are some family members who don’t have email addresses (we’re talking to you, Aunt Ida), you can still print and send a handful of invitations without breaking the bank or the environment. And, if you’d like a keepsake for your wall or wedding album, you can print one out, too.

    Do the Environment a Favor

    Unfortunately, party favors are one of the biggest offenders at weddings. While they’re a traditional and fun way to take the happy occasion home with you, they often end up in the trash. If you’re willing, forego the little gifts altogether and give a small donation to a charity in your guests’ name. Or, give something that will eventually leave little to no waste, like small jars of honey, cute plants, tea/coffee/spice blends, or reusable bags, cups, or straws. Consider this rule of thumb at bridal showers and bachelor/bachelorette parties as well.

    Dress to Impress ... the Earth

    What do they say about weddings? Everyone will remember the dress and the cake! It’s so tempting to want to buy the most expensive, elegant, show-stopping dress, but secondhand or heirloom dresses are an often overlooked option. Besides, heirloom dresses have special meaning when you know they’re being lovingly handed down from a cherished family member or friend. Also, men rent tuxedos, so what’s the big deal about women renting dresses? 

    Let Them Eat Cake

    Then send them home with leftovers! That goes for any food you may have at the end of the reception. The best way to handle food is to find out how many guests will be attending and plan for that number to prevent food waste altogether. But, if that doesn’t work out, you have a few options. Have your catering company, if you use one, pack up leftovers for guests. Or, you can donate uneaten food to local organizations for the food-insecure. Yes, it can be done, despite what your catering company might say! It’s important to make sure you have a food waste prevention or donation plan in place before the big day.

    Continue the Celebration

    Did you know you can donate a lot of items that can be reused after your wedding? Flowers can be donated and rearranged for hospitals, hospice facilities, and elderly communities to brighten people’s day. You can also allow your guests to take arrangements home, but whatever you do, don’t just toss all those flowers in the trash. Organic waste makes up the largest part of the waste stream. Decorations, dresses, favors, unwanted gifts that weren’t on your carefully curated registry, and wedding prep supplies can all be donated to prevent waste and allow someone else a chance to celebrate on a budget.

    Honeymoon Highlights

    Sure, most of us love the excitement of getting and unwrapping gifts! But, before you get giddy with the registry scanner, consider requesting funds for your honeymoon instead. Cash is always a good way to go, but if you’d like to suggest your guests contribute to a fund that will help you pay for fun activities, there are several honeymoon registry sites. The highlight of your honeymoon could be that your loved ones help pay for it! Who needs another toaster that will eventually break and end up in the trash anyway? Plus, imagine all that shredded foil, glittery paper and ribbons—you can’t recycle that stuff!

    If you’re into environmentalism, these tips are a great way to bring awareness to your guests and prevent waste. And they’re all great suggestions for saving money, too!

     

    Posted on In the Loop by TC Clark on Jun 27, 2019

  • Baseball Teams Make a Play for Less Waste

    It’s summertime, the kids are out of school, and families are packing up and heading to the ballpark for a baseball game.

    When you get to the game, it’s pretty much eating time. Sure, watching batters hit and pitchers pitch may be fun, but, come on, the little ones love going because they’re eating a hot dog, ice cream, or cotton candy. Heck, it’s tempting to get even more food during the seventh-inning stretch while hearing “Take Me Out to the Ball Game”, including this beauty from the lyrics: “Buy me some peanuts and Cracker Jack.” 

    tray of ballpark food -- hotdog, chips, soft drink

    But, recently, after watching a game with the family, I noticed something: trash underneath the seats—a lot of it.

    So, how much garbage is generated during a baseball game? Obviously, it depends on how many fans attend. But in 2010, the Los Angeles Daily News reported that 3.11 tons of trash were produced during a home game at Dodger Stadium. That’s quite a bit going to the landfill.

    Some major league and minor league teams are trying to change that. Those teams have created environmentally focused programs to promote recycling and composting, as well as overall sustainability. As part of the San Francisco Giants’ “Green Initiative,” the organization recycles or composts items like cans, bottles, plastic cups, cardboard, paper, wood pallets, electronic components, light bulbs, batteries, cooking grease, food waste, and grass clippings. The Giants claim 95.08 percent of the waste at their ballpark in 2016 was diverted from the landfill through their recycling and composting program.

    The San Diego Padres also have a recycling and waste diversion program. They have been promoting digital ticketing instead of paper tickets to fans while serving ballpark food with service trays and packaging made of recycled materials and biodegradable materials. Plastic drinking straws have also been replaced with paper straws.

    These programs only work if fans are conscientious about it. In other words, don’t just throw trash underneath the seats, but make an effort to find a garbage, recycling, or compost bin and dump it there. You can even collect your peanut shells and compost them yourself. (Here’s a recent blog about how to start composting.)

    We can all have fun watching the game, eating Cracker Jack and being mindful of our environment at the same time. That’s a home run in my scorebook. 

    Posted on In the Loop by Syd Fong on Jun 20, 2019