Listed below are recent posts across all of CalRecyle's blogs.

  • 5 Environmental Social Media Accounts You Need to Follow Today

    They say if you’re not on social media, you don’t exist. We all know that isn’t true, but it wouldn’t hurt to at least check in on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram every once in a while to see what’s happening in the world of environmentalism. Here are a few of the many social media accounts that we at CalRecycle think are worth a follow if you want to keep up with sustainability, environmentalism, climate change, recycling, and nature.

    Recycle by City

    Recycle by City provides specific recycling information to eight cities (three in California) with easy-to-follow instructions and visuals that help clear up recycling confusion. Always on the pulse of what is going on in the world of waste and environmentalism, Recycle by City deserves a follow on Twitter, Instagram, and/or Facebook—whichever you prefer.

    Podship Earth

    You’re missing out on all kinds of fascinating environmental topics if you’re not listening to Podship Earth, hosted by Jared Blumenfeld, CalEPA’s new secretary. While the Instagram and Facebook accounts both have relevant and interesting content, it’s best to subscribe to the podcast and/or follow on Twitter for the most up-to-date information.

    U.S. Interior

    The name doesn’t really do this Instagram account justice—while it sounds like it might be a photographic tour of America’s best interior designs, it’s actually more about the exterior. The U.S. Interior’s Instagram account will blow you away with breathtaking nature shots from federal lands—lands the department is charged with conserving. We love this particular account because it reminds us why we fight so hard to protect the planet.

    Save the Food

    In California, 1 in 8 people are food-insecure, including 1 in 5 children. Yet each year in our state alone, we waste approximately 5.6 million tons of food, which generates greenhouse gases when it decomposes in our landfills. Save the Food’s Facebook page is chock-full of statistics on food waste, how to prevent it, and tips on how to best store and repurpose food before it goes to waste. Plus, they’ve got quick videos that are fun and fascinating.

    The Story of Stuff Project

    Everyone’s stuff has a story! Whichever account you follow—Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, or even YouTube—The Story of Stuff Project will have some content that you can relate to. Whether it’s climate change, waste, or eco-friendly tips, following any or all of their accounts will not disappoint. Their quirky videos will have you thinking twice about your stuff after it’s not your stuff anymore.

    Posted on In the Loop by TC Clark on Mar 28, 2019

  • The Environment Is for Every Bunny

    Spring is baby animal season, and it can’t come soon enough! There’s nothing like a video of bunnies, chicks, and kittens to remind you to do your part to protect our environment. You’re welcome and thank you, from CalRecycle.


    Posted on In the Loop on Mar 14, 2019

  • CalRecycle Grant Funds Yolo County Slough Cleanup

    A rural area in Yolo County that has proven to be both a haven for songbirds and a target for illegal dumping is getting cleaned up with funding from CalRecycle.

    Landowners worked with the Yolo County Resource Conservation District to apply for a grant to clean up illegally dumped material, including garbage, appliances, and an estimated 250 to 500 waste tires, along a 15-acre section of Babel Slough. CalRecycle awarded the conservation district a $50,000 Farm and Ranch Cleanup and Abatement Grant for the project.

    Sacramento Regional Conservation Corps workers pull a large bag of garbage up an embankment at Babel Slough.

    Sacramento Regional Conservation Corps workers pull a large bag of garbage up an embankment at Babel Slough.

    The farm and ranch grant program plays a vital role in protecting human health and the environment. This portion of Babel Slough winds through active farmland, and farmers use the water to irrigate adjacent fields. Local farmers and ranchers pick up waste along the banks and roadways on a weekly basis and dispose of it legally, but they sought help for the material that required special equipment and a more concerted effort, including tires and appliances partially sunken in mud at the bottom of steep embankments. The resource conservation district joined forces with the Sacramento Regional Conservation Corps, which has conducted similar cleanups, for the project.

    After several hours, conservation corps workers had pulled piles of trash, including tires and appliances, from the water, and put them in piles along Babel Slough Road for removal. The piles lined the road for more than half a mile.

    In 2018, another stretch of the slough was cleaned up with a previous grant from CalRecycle. The conservation district intends to apply for a third grant for the final stretch in an upcoming grant cycle. Grants are limited to $50,000 per cleanup or abatement project, with a limit of $200,000 per year.

    While the project will result in cleaner irrigation water for the nearby agricultural fields, it will also provide a healthier habitat for the plants and animals that live there, including tree swallows, bay-breasted warblers, black-chinned sparrows, and American redstarts.

    Left: Workers bag illegally dumped material at the bottom of the slough. Right: Debris is piled at the side of Babel Slough Road for removal.

    Left: Workers bag illegally dumped material at the bottom of the slough. Right: Debris is piled at the side of Babel Slough Road for removal. 

    For more information, including how to apply for a grant, see our Farm and Ranch Solid Waste Cleanup and Abatement Grant Program webpage.

    Posted on In the Loop by Christina Files on Jan 17, 2019