Listed below are recent posts across all of CalRecyle's blogs.

  • Environmental Justice for All

    Environmental Justice is the fair treatment of all races, cultures, and incomes regarding the development, implementation, and enforcement of environmental laws, regulations, and policies. Check out this video to learn more.

    Environmental Justice for All Video
    Posted on In the Loop on Sep 26, 2019

  • CalRecycle Releases Draft EIR for SB 1383 Regulations

    CalRecycle has released its Draft Program Environmental Impact Report for the statewide adoption of regulations for Short-Lived Climate Pollutants: Organic Waste Methane Emission Reduction (SB 1383, Lara, Chapter 395, Statutes of 2016). Not quite sure what an EIR is? That’s OK. We’ve got you covered!

    What is an Environmental Impact Report?

    An EIR is a document that provides public agencies and the general public with detailed information about the effect a proposed project is likely to have on the environment. The document also lists the ways in which these effects might be minimized and whether there are any alternatives to such a project. (Public Resources Code §2106114 California Code of Regulations §15121)

    The SB 1383 draft Program EIR specifically addresses potential impacts to California’s scenery, light pollution, air quality emissions, greenhouse gas emissions, changes to traffic and transportation patterns, conversion of agricultural lands to other uses, and potential for land contamination by pathogens in compostable materials. The report also clarifies scope of CalRecycle’s authority to mitigate these environmental impacts.  

    The Big Picture

    California passed the California Environmental Quality Act in 1970 to institute a statewide policy of environmental protection. CEQA aims to inform decision makers and the public about the potential significant environmental impacts of new laws, identify ways that potential significant environmental impacts can be avoided or reduced, and prevent significant avoidable damage to the environment by requiring changes in the implementation of a project. The agency that will regulate the new law takes the lead and determines if an EIR is necessary.

    The public review and comment period for the SB 1383 draft EIR will be July 30, 2019, through September 13, 2019. CalRecycle will hold a public meeting on August 20 at 1 p.m. to discuss the draft EIR and receive comments.

    Posted on In the Loop by Christina Files on Aug 5, 2019

  • Planet Protecting-Prom: Dance the Night Away Eco-Guilt-Free

    Sandy and Danny dancing in the movie Grease

    Corsages and cummerbunds mark prom season just before the end of the school year. Soon students will be shopping for dresses, tuxes, and limos, but at what cost to the environment? If you’re a freshman to the world of sustainability, take note of these tips for a planet-protecting prom.

    Various prom dresses

    Give Fast Fashion the Slip

    It can be difficult to avoid those inexpensive clothing items when you or your teenager are fashion-forward on a budget. But, armed with the knowledge that the fashion industry (especially fast fashion) is one of the main contributors to landfill waste, pollution, and unfair labor practices, it might be a little easier to give up those bargain garments. Instead, try purchasing something secondhand. Just because it was previously owned, that does not mean it is cheap, tacky, or unsophisticated. In fact, most prom dresses are only worn once, so it’s likely any “used” dress will be in excellent condition—not to mention less expensive. You can also get creative and refashion a secondhand item that has potential. Don’t have enough room in your closet or not as creative as you’d like to be? Find a dress rental company in your area—tuxes are rented, so why can’t a dress be? Another option can be a formal clothing exchange between friends, an exchange program, or even your library—yes, your library! There are also plenty of places to donate your dress when you’re done with it.

    Olive Oyl applying makeup

    Makeover Your Cosmetic Bag

    Looking your best doesn’t stop at your outfit, and it shouldn’t come at the expense of the planet. Whether you or your teen wears makeup or simple moisturizer, applies lots of hair product or just needs a razor to get rid of unwanted stubble, there is an earth-friendly option for everyone. Start by asking what cosmetics and beauty accessories are made of—plastic or natural ingredients? Biodegradable or single-use? What about excess packaging? Look for zero-waste companies, or DIY your cosmetics.

    Limo driving to dance

    Limopool

    If you or your teen can afford to rent a limo, make sure to get as many passengers as possible. This will help offset the carbon emissions created by driving multiple cars, and it can also help bring down the cost of the rental. If a limo isn’t in the cards, try regular carpooling or even a pedicab if the venue is nearby. No one expects anyone to ride their bike in their formals, but a pedicab or even a horse-drawn carriage can be a fun and eco-friendly option if the dance is nearby.

    Peter Parker handing a corsage to his date

    Corsage Compost

    After the night is over, the formal footwear is kicked off and it’s time to hit the hay, don’t toss your boutoniere or corsage in the trash. If you don’t plan on hanging on to your flowers as a keepsake, compost it or throw it in your yard waste bin minus the ribbons, pins, and other decorations—you can always reuse those, but they don’t belong in the pile with other organic waste.

    Now get out there and promenade that planet-protecting way, knowing you did the right thing for future prom-goers!

    Posted on In the Loop by TC Clark on Apr 8, 2019