Listed below are recent posts across all of CalRecyle's blogs.

  • Planet Protecting-Prom: Dance the Night Away Eco-Guilt-Free

    Sandy and Danny dancing in the movie Grease

    Corsages and cummerbunds mark prom season just before the end of the school year. Soon students will be shopping for dresses, tuxes, and limos, but at what cost to the environment? If you’re a freshman to the world of sustainability, take note of these tips for a planet-protecting prom.

    Various prom dresses

    Give Fast Fashion the Slip

    It can be difficult to avoid those inexpensive clothing items when you or your teenager are fashion-forward on a budget. But, armed with the knowledge that the fashion industry (especially fast fashion) is one of the main contributors to landfill waste, pollution, and unfair labor practices, it might be a little easier to give up those bargain garments. Instead, try purchasing something secondhand. Just because it was previously owned, that does not mean it is cheap, tacky, or unsophisticated. In fact, most prom dresses are only worn once, so it’s likely any “used” dress will be in excellent condition—not to mention less expensive. You can also get creative and refashion a secondhand item that has potential. Don’t have enough room in your closet or not as creative as you’d like to be? Find a dress rental company in your area—tuxes are rented, so why can’t a dress be? Another option can be a formal clothing exchange between friends, an exchange program, or even your library—yes, your library! There are also plenty of places to donate your dress when you’re done with it.

    Olive Oyl applying makeup

    Makeover Your Cosmetic Bag

    Looking your best doesn’t stop at your outfit, and it shouldn’t come at the expense of the planet. Whether you or your teen wears makeup or simple moisturizer, applies lots of hair product or just needs a razor to get rid of unwanted stubble, there is an earth-friendly option for everyone. Start by asking what cosmetics and beauty accessories are made of—plastic or natural ingredients? Biodegradable or single-use? What about excess packaging? Look for zero-waste companies, or DIY your cosmetics.

    Limo driving to dance

    Limopool

    If you or your teen can afford to rent a limo, make sure to get as many passengers as possible. This will help offset the carbon emissions created by driving multiple cars, and it can also help bring down the cost of the rental. If a limo isn’t in the cards, try regular carpooling or even a pedicab if the venue is nearby. No one expects anyone to ride their bike in their formals, but a pedicab or even a horse-drawn carriage can be a fun and eco-friendly option if the dance is nearby.

    Peter Parker handing a corsage to his date

    Corsage Compost

    After the night is over, the formal footwear is kicked off and it’s time to hit the hay, don’t toss your boutoniere or corsage in the trash. If you don’t plan on hanging on to your flowers as a keepsake, compost it or throw it in your yard waste bin minus the ribbons, pins, and other decorations—you can always reuse those, but they don’t belong in the pile with other organic waste.

    Now get out there and promenade that planet-protecting way, knowing you did the right thing for future prom-goers!

    Posted on In the Loop by TC Clark on Apr 8, 2019

  • 5 Environmental Social Media Accounts You Need to Follow Today

    They say if you’re not on social media, you don’t exist. We all know that isn’t true, but it wouldn’t hurt to at least check in on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram every once in a while to see what’s happening in the world of environmentalism. Here are a few of the many social media accounts that we at CalRecycle think are worth a follow if you want to keep up with sustainability, environmentalism, climate change, recycling, and nature.

    Recycle by City

    Recycle by City provides specific recycling information to eight cities (three in California) with easy-to-follow instructions and visuals that help clear up recycling confusion. Always on the pulse of what is going on in the world of waste and environmentalism, Recycle by City deserves a follow on Twitter, Instagram, and/or Facebook—whichever you prefer.

    Podship Earth

    You’re missing out on all kinds of fascinating environmental topics if you’re not listening to Podship Earth, hosted by Jared Blumenfeld, CalEPA’s new secretary. While the Instagram and Facebook accounts both have relevant and interesting content, it’s best to subscribe to the podcast and/or follow on Twitter for the most up-to-date information.

    U.S. Interior

    The name doesn’t really do this Instagram account justice—while it sounds like it might be a photographic tour of America’s best interior designs, it’s actually more about the exterior. The U.S. Interior’s Instagram account will blow you away with breathtaking nature shots from federal lands—lands the department is charged with conserving. We love this particular account because it reminds us why we fight so hard to protect the planet.

    Save the Food

    In California, 1 in 8 people are food-insecure, including 1 in 5 children. Yet each year in our state alone, we waste approximately 5.6 million tons of food, which generates greenhouse gases when it decomposes in our landfills. Save the Food’s Facebook page is chock-full of statistics on food waste, how to prevent it, and tips on how to best store and repurpose food before it goes to waste. Plus, they’ve got quick videos that are fun and fascinating.

    The Story of Stuff Project

    Everyone’s stuff has a story! Whichever account you follow—Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, or even YouTube—The Story of Stuff Project will have some content that you can relate to. Whether it’s climate change, waste, or eco-friendly tips, following any or all of their accounts will not disappoint. Their quirky videos will have you thinking twice about your stuff after it’s not your stuff anymore.

    Posted on In the Loop by TC Clark on Mar 28, 2019

  • CalRecycle Awards $71,000 to Clear Illegal Dumpsites

    Local Boy Scout Troop to Help Restore Farm and Ranch Land

    Media Contact: Lance Klug
    (916) 341-6293 Lance.Klug@CalRecycle.ca.gov

    SACRAMENTO – The California Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery is awarding $71,132 in cleanup grants to restore public nature areas and animal grazing land in Lassen and Madera counties. The local sites are overrun with illegally dumped appliances, tires, household hazardous waste, electronic waste, construction scraps, and other debris, posing a threat to public health and the environment.

    “California must protect the farm, ranch and agricultural lands that help feed people and contribute to our economy.” CalRecycle Director Scott Smithline said. “CalRecycle is committed to keeping these open, rural spaces clean and productive for generations to come.”

    CalRecycle’s Farm and Ranch Solid Waste Cleanup and Abatement Grant Program provides up to $1 million annually for the cleanup of illegal solid waste on farm or ranch property where the owner is not responsible for the illegally dumped debris.

    Madera County

    CalRecycle is awarding the Coarsegold Resource Conservation District a $21,132 grant to help clear a stretch of the Willow Creek Trail loop, the Cheapo Saddle Shooting Range, and the Central Camp Road grotto in the county and Sierra National Forest. The sites are on dirt roads with hiking trails and are prone to illegal dumping. A local Boy Scout troop will help support the project by removing recyclables and trash following the cleanup. New garbage and recycling bins, signage and increased monitoring will be put in place to help prevent future dumping.

    Central Camp Road Grotto cleanup site

    The Central Camp Road grotto site will be cleaned up with funding from CalRecycle. 

    Lassen County

    CalRecycle is awarding the Honey Lake Valley Resource Conservation a $50,000 grant to help clear a 45-acre debris field within the 360-acre Bertotti Ranch. The land is used as a cattle, sheep and pig pasture and serves as graze land for these and other livestock throughout the year. The ungated property was unoccupied for decades. Its proximity to a nearby community and public road made it a frequent illegal dumping ground. New fencing and increased monitoring are expected to help prevent future dumping.

    Bertotti Ranch site

    This Bertotti Ranch site will also be cleaned up.

    Under the farm and ranch grant program, cities, counties, federally recognized Native American tribes, and resource conservation districts may apply for up to $200,000 per fiscal year, but no more than $50,000 per site. Grants are funded through the state’s Integrated Waste Management Account, Tire Recycling Management Fund, and Used Oil Recycling Fund. Get automatic updates on new grant cycles, awards, and funding availability by subscribing to CalRecycle’s Farm and Ranch Cleanup Grant listserv.

    Posted on In the Loop by Lance Klug on Feb 28, 2019