Listed below are recent posts across all of CalRecyle's blogs.

  • California Resource Recovery Association: A Culture of Zero Waste

    CalRecycle staff speaking at podiums, speaking to conference members, and an outdoor group photo.

    Since 1974, the nonprofit organization California Resource Recovery Association has been working toward a more sustainable California through promoting product stewardship, waste prevention, and recycling. The group’s annual conference for which we are a sponsor, brings together cities, counties, councilmembers, businesses, nonprofit organizations, and industry professionals to network and discuss environmental issues. Every year, CalRecycle staff and guest speakers offer a cornucopia of information about policies, practices, and studies at comprehensive educational and plenary sessions.

    At this year’s conference, we participated in four panels on topics ranging from e-waste and grants to statewide recycling to educate attendees about upcoming regulations, funding programs, and waste management practices. We even got to meet Ryan Hickman, the 10-year-old mini-mogul who has taken the recycling world by storm by starting his own business at the age of 3! Other speakers included Timothy Bouldry of the International Solid Waste Association, which runs a scholarship program for children living in dumpsites across the world; and Froilan Grate, who is the executive director of GAIA Philippines, which educates and promotes community-based waste management and construction of material recovery facilities.

    Posted on In the Loop by - TC Clark on Aug 22, 2019

  • Camp Fire Cleanup: Safety First

    The California Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery joined its state and local partners in California’s Consolidated Debris Removal Program on Wednesday, July 24 to re-emphasize operational safety to crews involved in the Camp Fire cleanup effort in Butte County. 

    Cal OES photo of multi-agency Camp Fire Debris Removal safety briefing on Wednesday, July 24, 2019.

    Cal OES photo of multi-agency Camp Fire Debris Removal safety briefing on Wednesday, July 24, 2019.

    The all-hands-on-deck meetings took place at both debris removal contractor base camps at 6:30 a.m. ahead of debris removal operations and included representatives from CalRecycle, the California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services, the California Highway Patrol and the California Department of Transportation. The latest safety briefing was held in addition to regular safety-focused meetings to help reinforce safety protocols as the project progresses. Read more about the safety briefing on this Cal OES Newsroom post.

    Posted on In the Loop by Lance Klug on Jul 25, 2019

  • Light Shows: Fireworks Without the Messy Cleanup

    This Fourth of July, Sacramento’s Cal Expo will have its traditional fireworks show. But for the California State Fair later this summer, the fairgrounds facility will not have a fireworks display. Instead, fair organizers have decided to use a drone light show. They say this is a way to be environmentally safer and more inclusive to those who are sensitive to loud explosions.

    While large fireworks shows can seem like a blast to view in person—pardon the pun—they often require massive post-show cleanups.

    For example, following the Super Bowl 50 fireworks show in San Francisco in 2016, four 5-gallon trash cans worth of pyrotechnic debris washed ashore at the San Francisco’s Aquatic Park. Two years ago, in Lake Tahoe, debris from a Fourth of July show washed up on a beach. And a similar incident happened in the Seattle area when volunteers picked up 533 pounds of trash (fireworks debris and other waste) in Lake Union after the Independence Day festivities.

    One area in California has already taken measures to keep fireworks show organizers accountable and have best practices in place to keep fireworks-related pollutants out of the water and to require cities to report post-show cleanup efforts. For a public fireworks display over any water body within the boundaries of the San Diego Region, the city or show organizer must receive a general National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit from the San Diego Water Board.

    OK, let’s go back to the drone show. Does it even look halfway decent? Well, upon some review, the drone light show doesn’t seem half bad. And if this is a way to keep less debris from falling into our waters and ending up in our landfills, it may not be a bad option this summer or for years to come.

    If you’re in the Sacramento area, see both shows and see what you think!


    Posted on In the Loop by Syd Fong on Jul 1, 2019