Listed below are recent posts across all of CalRecyle's blogs.

  • Yolo County Prepares for SB 1383 Implementation with Launch of New Anaerobic Composter

    organic food scraps and hands holding compost

    Yolo County began operating a new anaerobic composter on Oct.1 that can recycle 52,000 tons of organic waste each year into compost, biofuel, and electricity. 

     The facility will keep that organic material out of the county landfill. In landfills, organic waste decomposes and generates methane, which is a major contributor to climate change.

     Instead, food waste, grass clippings, and other organic material collected from local businesses and residents is delivered to the anaerobic composting facility, a 10-acre spot with seven “cells,” at the Yolo County Central Landfill site. 

     When the organic material is delivered to this site, it is ground up and deposited into cells. Each cell is sealed by spraying the surface with a mixture of cement, fibers, and polymer. Once the bacteria-rich liquid is pumped into the cell, the anaerobic digestion process takes place, and in less than six months, biogas is finally produced.

     “Moisture is removed from the biogas produced, and it’s injected into an internal combustion engine that burns the gas, which creates electricity,” said Ramin Yazdani, Director of Yolo County Integrated Waste Management.  “The electricity goes on the grid and is sold to SMUD (Sacramento Municipal Utility District).”

     After methane production has dropped off, the is operated aerobically, utilizing the aeration piping system. Air is injected into the cells to aerate the digestate material for a two-week aerobic digestion phase. This creates compost. 

     The material is then excavated, cured, and screened of contamination. Once the process is complete, the county will sell the compost to residents and businesses. 

     Compost has many beneficial uses, including as a soil amendment and in erosion control. Learn more about compost on our website.

     In 2007, Yolo County received a $200,000 CalRecycle grant to run a pilot project that broke down 2,000 tons of organic waste in a smaller cell.

     “That created the basis of our current design,” Ramin said, “and it showed us operational challenges that we had to learn from in order to design and operate a better system.”

    Posted on In the Loop by Syd Fong on Nov 18, 2019

  • CalRecycle Crews Stay Safe During Camp Fire Debris Removal Project

     

    Fire Debris Removal Crew meeting in a church

     

    Since the beginning of Camp Fire debris removal in February 2019, cleanup crews working under CalRecycle contracts have been meeting on Wednesday mornings for weekly all-hands safety meetings. At the peak of the project, thousands would pack into the Paradise Alliance Church, one of the largest buildings that survived the devastating November 2018 wildfire. Operations chiefs and safety officers from CalRecycle would reinforce safety protocols, provide training, and support workforce morale.

    At the meetings, crews were recognized for work that went beyond hauling debris to providing outstanding outreach and support for individual homeowners. With up to 150 workers scattered among the 150,000 acres of the burn scar, the morning meetings gave everyone a sense of how big the operation was and allowed them to see the other members of a recovery team that measured in the thousands.

     

    Fire safety meeting outside in early morning.

     

    With 99.9 percent of properties cleared, the numbers were much smaller for the all-hands meeting on Oct. 30, 2019. But with public safety power shutdowns in effect, the safety message was just as critical: Be careful in the wind, look for falling branches, and be aware of traffic and intersections. And speakers gave their talks not from a church stage with a sound system, but from the back of a pickup truck under flashlights.

     

    Fire Crew meeting outside

     

    Posted on In the Loop by Chris McSwain on Nov 14, 2019

  • Butte Strong: In Remembrance of the Paradise Camp Fire

    CalRecycle remembers the tremendous loss to Butte County and the communities of Paradise, Concow, and Magalia on the one-year anniversary of the Camp Fire. We honor their strength and resilience as they turn the page from recovery to rebuilding.

    Join us on Friday, November 8, at 11:08 a.m. for 85 seconds of silence for those whose lives were lost.

    picture of home being reconstructed.
    Posted on In the Loop by CalRecycle Staff on Nov 7, 2019